Painted Cast iron William Tell Mechanical Bank Stevens 1896

It is a very attractive bank with excellent action and subject matter. The coin taking part in the action, in this case representing an arrow, is a particularly desirable feature. Every aspect of the William Tell Bank makes it one of the great mechanical banks.

The William Tell was designed by Russell Frisbie of Cromwell, Conn., and patented June 23, 1896. It was manufactured by the J. & E. Stevens Company, also of Cromwell CT. The design drawings are practically identical to the bank as manufactured by Stevens.

To operate, the odd shaped piece on the gun barrel is pressed back where it snaps into position as the head of William Tell lowers, taking aim. A coin is placed on top of the barrel just in front of this piece. The boy’s right arm is pulled down bringing the apple to the top of his head. Then the right foot of William Tell is pressed down. This fires the gun and the coin shoots forward knocking the apple from the boy’s head as he raises his right arm and a bell inside the castle rings.

The patent date June 23, 1896 is cast in raised letters on the underside of the base. The conventional round Stevens coin trap is under the castle in the base plate.

Reference: The Bank Book B. Norman p.58 figure 5940

Condition: Minor paint loss, good working order. Bell rings.

Approximate Dimensions: Length 10 1/2" x Height 6 3/4" x Depth 3 1/4".

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